urban docks

Urban docks proposed for Toronto's waterfront

NXT City Prize, the annual urban design competition that seeks creative proposals from those under 35, released its list of finalists today. Each of the eight entries highlights ways to improve Toronto by manipulating physical or digital space to make the city more liveable for all of us.

Clint Langevin and Ya'el Santopinto made it to the finals with their proposal to implement urban docks along the existing breakwater infrastructure Toronto's waterfront. This, they write, would give city-dwellers better access to Lake Ontario.

Other contenders include an urban farming project, a RavineLine, a Parks Toronto app as well as an app to make it easier for Torontonians to book city-owned public spaces.

The seven member jury, which includes Chief Planner Jennifer Keesemaat, Joseph Mimran and Matty Matheson, will give away $9,000 in prize money at the NXT City Night happening September 24. Along with the finalists, a number of short-listed projects are eligible for a People's Choice award, which will be determined by Facebook likes.

While there's no guarantee that any of these projects will come to fruition, they all help us think about our city in new and innovative ways.

The winners will be officially announced at NXT City Night on September 24, 2015. Open to the public, the event will be held in Build Toronto's former St. Andrew's Market Hall at 56 Maud St in downtown Toronto.Tickets for NXT City Night are $25.


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