tolls toronto

Tolls could be coming to the DVP and Gardiner

Would you pay to use the Gardiner Expressway and the DVP? You may just have to in the future because the city is looking at implementing tolls to cover costs related to operating and maintaining both roadways.

A report (PDF) delivered to the city's executive committee outlines two potential options for a tolling system. One would require drivers to pay a flat-fee, between $1.25-$3.25 to use the roads, while the other would be distance-based, like the 407, according to the Toronto Star. This one would cost drivers between 10 to 35 cents per kilometre; in both scenarios, trucks would pay more.

Earlier this year, city staff started looking at tolls after city council approved the pricey "hybrid" option for the East Gardiner. The report suggests that the Gardiner will cost the city $3.8 billion over the next 30 years - it estimates the DVP will ring in at $200 million over the same amount of time.

The flat-fee, or open, tolling system would set the city back around $28 million while the distance-based, or closed, system would cost $20 million more. They'd each cost around $31 to $37 million per year.

However, as City News reports, council would need to look into this matter further if it were to seriously consider adding tolls to these two major roads.

Do you think the city should add tolls to the DVP and Gardiner? Let us know in the comment.

Photo by Stephen Gardiner in the blogTO Flickr pool.


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