charities toronto

10 under the radar charities in Toronto

Charities in Toronto offer a wide range of services, like support, shelter, food, and mentorship to those in the city who need it most. From preventative measures for our youth to recovery assistance for those who have fallen on hard times, these organizations help make our beautiful city a better place. Head to their websites to find out more about how you can donate or volunteer with these organizations.

Here are 10 under the radar charities in Toronto.

Frontlines
Since 1987, Frontlines in Weston has been a place for youth to come in, hang out, and feel safe. The organization still maintains a strong presence, attracting disadvantaged youth seeking mentorship opportunities and offering up the skills and knowledge needed to prosper.

Sistering
Located in Bloorcourt village, Sistering is an organization devoted to women who have fallen on hard times and are looking for a safe place to drop in to. Here these women are able to get a hot meal, a shower, take part in support and recreational programs, and much more.

Parc
To help those who deal with poverty, addiction, mental health and other issues, Parc opened its doors over 30 years ago and still remains a pivotal part of the Parkdale community. There are four main programs at Parc consisting of a drop in program, an outreach program (working more one on one with staff), a peer outreach program, and affordable housing options.

St. Alban's Boys & Girls Club
St. Alban's Boys & Girls Club, with its main location on Palmerston near Dupont, is a great place for youth to come and join in on any number of programs they have on offer. Programs range from tutoring and mentoring, to aquatic and recreational activities. Adults are also welcomed to drop in for meditation and fitness classes.

Dixon Hall
Dixon Hall in Corktown aims to create opportunities for everyone from high-risk youth and isolated seniors to immigrants and the homeless. One of their signature partnerships, Out of the Cold provides shelter to the homeless community in Toronto - something that's much needed particularly when the winter's deep freeze begins to set in. There are currently 19 different faith groups in Toronto that provide this service, with Dixon Hall being the main point of contact.

The Peer Project
The Peer Project (also known as Youth Assisting Youth) in North York matches children aged 6 - 15 with youth volunteers aged 16 - 29 to provide mentorship and guidance to potentially at-risk children. With prevention being the main goal, there are various programs including one on one mentorship and Saddle Up (a therapeutic horse riding program).

One More Wear
The One More Wear Foundation, located near Dufferin Grove, accepts donated clothing for those living in poverty. With an aim to aid those looking for employment or simply looking to pursue their goals, they offer job seminars and workshops on top of helping people to feel more confident in their clothing.

Barbra Schlifer Clinic
The Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic in Little Italy is a place where women can free themselves from violence. Offering counseling, legal representation, and language interpretation, this clinic is run by skilled women for women to help end violence and rebuild lives.



Microskills
While its head office is situated in Etobicoke, Microskills helps individuals in communities all throughout Toronto to make better lives for themselves. Their programs help with settlement, employment or self-employment, and enabling people to become more self-sufficient and economically stable.

What other Toronto-based charities do more people need to know about? Add them to the comments.

Writing by Chynna Wilson. Photo via PARC on Facebook.


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