This should be invisible

Jack Layton Memorial Toronto

What should Toronto name in memory of Jack Layton?

The collection of chalk messages for Jack Layton at Nathan Phillips Square is one of the most touching tributes I've ever witnessed, and I would suspect that such an observation holds true for many others as well. Even as rainfall washed away many of the notes earlier today, citizens have continued to put up more, determined to prolong the celebration of his life.

Perhaps because more rain is inevitable and the temporary nature of this effort will ultimately fade, there's already been much talk of what would make for a fitting permanent memorial for Layton in Toronto. For many it's been taken as a given that there will be something, so the discussion is focused on what would honour him best. Even if such a memorial might not come to be in the immediate future, dreaming up what Toronto could name in his memory is yet another way to celebrate his life and give thanks for his contributions to the city and country.

While places already named after Toronto politicians aren't about to changed — i.e. Nathan Phillips Square — new parks, cycling infrastructure and public spaces that aren't already tied to another individual might make be possible candidates. Here are some ideas from our Twitter followers. What would you suggest?

Photo by mauriciojcalero in the blogTO Flickr pool


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