Man and Dog

Morning Brew: August 7th, 2008

Photo: "pssst!!" by munzz, member of the blogTO Flickr pool.

Your Toronto morning news roundup for Thursday August 7th, 2008:

The city is planning on cracking down on people that scavenge from curbside blue boxes, claiming the city is losing money because of the practice. Still no decision to crack down on those raccoons that scavenge (and tear apart) my garbage bags on the curb.

Feeling a bit squeezed when you're walking down the sidewalk? It doesn't look like things are going to get much better, as the city keeps planning on selling sidewalk space to accommodate businesses in making room for vehicle lay-bys. Time to get a little bit closer as you walk through Yorkville.

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The housing market in Toronto seems to be cooling off, with sales dropping 14% this July compared to the same time last year. Any real estate experts out there know if we should be thinking of buying now, or are prices expected to fall in the near future?

Researchers at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children have found a way to turn human embryonic stem cells into a cell type that creates vital body organs, a breakthrough in medical science. Makes me glad to know that my contributions to Sick Kids are going to research that actually makes a difference.

The Salaheddin Islamic Centre is posting bail money for Abdullah Khadr — which may be hurting Khadr's case even more, as it is rumored that the Centre has ties to Muslim extremists.

The Jays keep winning, which means they're going to be so close to the playoffs at the end of the season but still eventually break our hearts in a tragic meltdown. Like every other Toronto sports team.


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