20070607--4077.jpg

Record Increase in Public Transit Ridership


For many of us, we know the pains of morning rush hour on our two and a quarter subway lines. By 2020, there will be over a million more people living in the GTA. A big chunk of them will be using our already saturated highways, and public transit. Traffic congestion in the city affects us all, economically, socially and environmentally. To try to curb the rise of these problems, our governments have recently announced the expansion of Toronto's public transit system. But will these plans survive for instance a change in government?

The Canadian Urban Transit Association released some good news this week. Preliminary figures for 2006 showed a 3.21 per cent increase in ridership across Canada. Doing the math, ridership grew by 52.7 million trips year over year, equaling approximately the total trips made in a city the size of Edmonton. With all the buzz about climate change and energy conservation, there is no sign of this trend letting go anytime soon. This is all the more reason for the Federal Transport Minister Lawrence Cannon to stick to his commitment to develop a national transit strategy. Last year the association recommended $20.7 billion worth of upgrades for public transit infrastructure for 2006-2010. As long as there is an increase in demand, the full expansion of the transit system has a chance of becoming reality.

transitcity.jpg

Latest Videos



Latest Videos


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

Toronto area's biggest transit boost in a decade comes with a major downgrade

Toronto's road closure and traffic situation is about to get much worse

Gardiner Expressway lane closures are already causing gridlock on other Toronto roads

Is Toronto losing its reputation as one of the world's cleanest cities?

Here are all the parking ticket changes coming to Toronto this summer

One of Canada's most dangerous plants is starting to bloom in Toronto

High Park cherry blossoms could finally bloom this weekend after being delayed

Toronto's most cursed intersection was just torn up yet again