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Decking the Halls for Hunger Relief

"Deck the Halls with Boughs of Kool-aid" would've been a fitting holiday jingle to hear as I checked out the efforts of city designers and architects for Canstruction. The event, to raise awareness of urban hunger problems and help Toronto's Daily Bread Food Bank, has a simple message - It starts with one can - but it took much more than that for each design team to build their structures from tin cans and kool-aid packets.

Throughout the lobbies of our black TD towers are the fruits of their labour - mostly cutesy icons with cutesy titles. The giant Winnie the Pooh titled "No More Rumbly-In-The-Tumbly" was the competition's juror's favourite, though it was the C-a-n-quarium made of tuna and sardine cans impossibly held together with elastic bands and paperclips that seemed most impressive.

It's a unique and fun way to get the message across, though I couldn't help but think the event may be missing its target market in these hurried halls. I just couldn't imagine too many nine-to-fivers taking a moment to think about world hunger when their own hunger pangs are pulling them past Pooh in the direction of the food court.

I'm pleased to be proved wrong however. During the drive last year a record 62,000 pounds of food were donated. Perhaps it's easier to pull at the public's heartstrings when taken back to the memories of childhood. Whatever works. Bring your food donations down to the TD Centre until Friday.


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