National Commuter Challenge

Take the Commuter Challenge


Want a way to help the environment, increase city pride, and win some prizes at the same time? The National Commuter Challenge, a Canada-wide competition to increase the awareness of the benefits of sustainable commuting, gives you the opportunity to do all that an more.

The Commuter Challenge is a friendly competition between Canadian cities held during Environment Week designed to increase the number of healthy commuters, reduce road congestion and cut automobile emissions. In 2005, more than 40,000 Canadians in more than 100 cities participated. By encouraging Canadians to walk, bike, run, in-line skate, use public transit, carpool, or work from home, the Commuter Challenge in 2005 managed to cut over 3 million driving kilometres across the country over one week.

With less than 0.01% of city residents participating in the challenge last year, it is clear that Toronto has a lot of catching up to do. Last year's winning community, the National Capital Region, had over 11,000 participants compared to Toronto's 294.

Contact your employer and encourage them to get involved (through the Smart Commute Association), or register directly through the Commuter Challenge website and follow up on what's going on in Toronto during Environment Week to promote the challenge. Civic pride aside, it may just make sense to put away the car this summer, as the smog alerts are already adding up.

Image: CommuterChallenge.ca


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