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Suzuki to Toronto: Hope and Education are Key


At the age of 70, respected Canadian environmentalist Dr. David Suzuki continues to make appearances across the country and the world at a pace most teenage rock bands wouldn't attempt. On Wednesday night, he discussed with Torontonians the state of the world's fish resources at Fish Forever. In an elegant manner, he reminded us of some bleak truths

I remember during the 1940's and 1950's people used to say "There's plenty more where that came from." There isn't plenty more anymore. We human beings have filled the Earth up, and we're depleting the great biological resources of this Earth. And we used to say that "that's the price of progress." I don't think it's progress to use up the rightful legacy of our children and grandchildren.

On Thursday afternoon Suzuki was at York University to take part in a panel discussion on sustainable cities, and later in the evening he was interviewed by Indigo CEO Heather Reisman about his best-selling autobiography at the Bay/Bloor Indigo bookstore. It was a wonderful chance to hear the him speak about his personal life, and how his career evolved over time.

What did I think the take home message was? Although we've done a lot of damage, and although some may argue that it's already too late, we must have hope. We must emphasize education and spread knowledge and hope that we can make out planet sustainable for future generations.

Note: Nearing the end of the discussion, Heather Reisman made what appeared to be an impromptu proposal for spreading hope and education that was gratefully accepted by Suzuki. In the near future, watch for a David Suzuki recommended environmental reading list for children and adults to appear in Indigo, Chapters, and Coles stores. And watch for the proposed 30% discount on all of these titles!


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