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U of T Professor Killed In Bike Collision


I don't take the TTC, I avoid cabs, and I just don't have the patience to do any real walking. I bike everywhere. So whenever I hear about a biker being killed in Toronto, I take it to heart. On April 20th, Hubert van Tol, professor of pharmacology at U of T, was killed when he was struck by a dump truck biking at Avenue Rd. and Briar Hill Ave.

Torontoist, Eye, Spacing, and Reading Toronto are all blaming this death on the lack of side-guard regulations for trucks.

From the Eye article:

"this man's death was entirely preventable. In fact, if he'd been involved in a similar accident in the UK or Europe, he'd likely be alive right now. That's because, on the other side of the Atlantic, trucks are required to have side guards that prevent cyclists, pedestrians and small cars from getting underneath transport trucks. When a cyclist in France strikes the side of a truck, instead of falling underneath the truck and being run over, she bounces off the guard and falls away from the path of the wheels. Such a cyclist may be injured, but in most cases she'll still be alive."

Since we can't expect the city to suddenly start doing the right thing, bikers need to take safety into their own hands. I just bought myself a new helmet, and I am constantly thinking about ways to avoid dangerous biking situations. Please honour Hubert van Tol by protecting yourself too. [Originally posted on The Newspaper]


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