Second Sunday of October: Matthew Doc Dunn No Angels Dancing

Somewhere There presents

the Second Sunday of October

Array Space 155 Walnut Avenue, Toronto

Sunday 12 October, 2014

8pm

$10/pwyc

8pm

Matthew Doc Dunn, solo guitar electronics

9pm

No Angels Dancing

Allison Cameron electrics, banjo D. Alex Meeks drums Stephen Parkinson guitars

Matthew 'Doc' Dunn is a guitar wrangler and multi-instrumentalist, a indefatigable collaborator and soloist with a budding international following. His resume is a trip through small & fiercely independent scenes: he's toured and recorded extensively with Matt Valentine and Erika Elder MV&EE and others from the Vermont-based cosmic folk world, along with TO fellow-traveller Mike Smith; he plays drums with Brooklyn-based band Woods whenever he can; back home, he leads a shifting and occasionally existent minimal big-band called the Transcendental Rodeo and a glistening meditative pop duo called Sacred Lamp with Ayal Senior; he plays universally aware free-jazz with the NYC/Toronto crew of Andy Haas, Colin Fisher, Brandon Valdivia, & Aaron Lumley; he co-founded Offerings magazine and wrote a column where he dug through the back catalogue of Canadian innovators. His music draws on a century of North American experimentation, irrespective of labels. His recordings have appeared, among others, on Bennifer Editions, Healing Power Records, Medusa, and Resonant Music, as well as his own Cosmic Range imprint. Recent recordings include the solo records All Is, a floating space-jazz number, and Tecumseh, a six-string & more tribute to the betrayed visionary and radical, and the group record Ask the Oracle, with Haas, Fisher, Valdivia, and Lumley. Matthew continues to perform, record, and dig through his deep archives or recordings, sending his missives out to Toronto, Turtle Island, and beyond.

No Angels Dancing

First there were two, then three.

In early days it was thought that there was a schism in medieval philosophy about how many angels could dance on the head of a pin. And so D. Alex came to create the name of our group.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: The question, "How many angels can dance on the head of a pin?" has been used many times as a dismissal of medieval angelology in particular, and of scholasticism in general. H. S. Lang, author of Aristotle's Physics and its Medieval Varieties 1992, says p. 284: "The question of how many angels can dance on the point of a needle, or the head of a pin, is often attributed to 'late medieval writers' ... In point of fact, the question has never been found in this form".


Second Sunday of October: Matthew Doc Dunn No Angels Dancing

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