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Occupy Toronto Protests

Posted by Derek Flack / October 15, 2011

Occupy Toronto ProtestThe Occupy Toronto movement has set up shop at St. James Park near Church and Adelaide streets, where thousands are participating in a variety of peaceful demonstrations. The crowd departed King and Bay shortly after 11 a.m. to make their way to the previously unspecified location for the occupation, which will continue indefinitely.

Thus far the atmosphere has been more enthusiastic than combative, as participants rally against everything from unfettered capitalism and corporate greed to Native land rights. As was anticipated, the causes represented here are myriad, though spontaneous chants identifying the crowd as the 99% have proved something of a unifier.

Update (October 16th, 12:00pm):

Check out our post on day two of Occupy Toronto for more updates/info.

Update (October 16th, 1:30am):

Here's what the scene looked like around midnight at St. James Park. Although I tweeted that there might be 50-75 tents, after a full walk-around I think the number is closer to 100. There were a few hundred people spread out across the park when I left at 12:30 a.m. The mood was upbeat as demonstrators clustered around the tent city and gazebo eating turkey stew and winding down. Along with a fair bit of weed smoking, I also spotted volunteers picking up garbage, folks debating religion, political theory and geneder (in)equality. All in all, good stuff.

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Update (10:30pm):

Video of the percussion group that formed in St. James Park today:

Update (9:30pm):

Five things we've learned so far about Occupy Toronto:

  • 1. The media presence has been huge so far, forming its own occupation on Adelaide Street to the north of the park. Keeping attention on the occupations as it continues beyond its first weekend will be key to its continued momentum.
  • 2. This is not the G20. Was it ever going to be? Although CP24 reported that two people were arrested earlier today, there was no sign of riot cops or Black Bloc tactics. On the contrary, the cops have been remained in the background and the demonstrators have kept it all peaceful.
  • 3. The protests do lack cohesion — but only to a point. While groups clustered in various areas around the park, by the time the General Assembly came around things pulled together for a bit. One way of reading the formation of factions is that they're demonstrative of the participants' belief that occupation will be around for the long haul and thus don't feel intense pressure to make it all happen in one day. You can expect the disparate messages about things like 9/11, the local food movement and Native land rights to fade as the occupation continues.
  • 4. Police will not issue tickets for those who sleep in the park overnight. What we don't know is if this will still be the case after the initial crowds have given way to the remaining die-hard demonstrators.
  • 5. It's not a cliche to say that today was just the beginning. Although there was a solid turn-out that hovered at around 2500-3000 as people came and went from St. James Park, the test of the protestors' resolve will begin in the wee hours tonight and continue into the coming days. Should it all fizzle out by midweek, Occupy Toronto will be but a blip on the radar — but it's way to early to say which way it'll go.

Update (8:45pm):

Some more photos from today courtesy of Tom Ryaboi and Scott Snider:

Occupy TorontoThis dude was Mr. Personality all day (and loved the media attention)Occupy TorontoBlack bloc or medical volunteer (hint: the latter)Occupy TorontoThe embraceOccupy TorontoNot the G20, but memories...Occupy TorontoI think that sign should say Karl Marx was rightOccupy TorontoIt is Kevin Clarke!

Update (7:00pm):

Here's a few #OccupyToronto tweets:

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Update (6:00pm)

Some observations, courtesy of blogTO photographer Scott Snider:

  • The crowd was, in general, older than I anticipated. I thought it would be mainly students and those in their early 20's, but if I had to guess I'd say the average age was closer to 30.
  • There were some organized groups (Socialists; Marxists; Unions) but individual participants made up the majority
  • The mood was very buoyant and light throughout the day
  • The most compelling faction/area for me was the open mic set up at the north end of the park. People stood up to tell their stories and engage in short discussions of what brought them out today. Two examples: a middle aged man who had an adverse reaction to prescribed medication who now has to support his family on $400 a week WSIB claim and a senior whose pension was "stolen" by corporate malfeasance. Most seemed to be spontaneous declarations by "plain folk" who were fed up with the status quo.
  • The police presence consisted mostly of bike cops; who seemed to bend over backwards to keep out of the way and were generally happy to chat with the demonstrators. I didn't spot any confrontations.
  • By mid-afternoon there were 25 or so tents set up around the park, with a concentration in the east end.
  • There really were a wide variety of causes being espoused, but the basic message was as follows: "the system is broken and we need to take back control from multinationals."

Update (5:40pm):

Here's the livestream:

Watch live streaming video from occupytoronto at livestream.com

Update (5:00pm):

Here's a bunch more photos of the scene at St. James Park this afternoon. We'll share some additional written observations in a bit.

Occupy TorontoA tent city is set to go, but how full will it be at 4:00 a.m. tomorrow morning?

Occupy TorontoThems be some fine accomodations

Occupy TorontoBook sale!

Occupy TorontoThe best vehicle for a protest against capitalism: the Segway

Occupy TorontoNaturally, a host of socialist and communist groups made an appearance

Occupy TorontoThe drum circle was actually quite impressive

Occupy TorontoArtist Joel Richardson was on hand with some artistic signs

Occupy TorontoFood station

Occupy TorontoHmmmm. Who's representing the indie coffee joints at this protest?

Occupy TorontoAt long last, the port-o-potties!

20111016-oc-kevin-clarke.jpgHey! Is that Kevin Clarke with the Stanley Cup?

20111016-oc-the-tree.jpgOccupy Tree-O

Update (2:30pm):

Here's our first roundup of photos of the protests, with plenty more to come later today and tonight.

Occupy Toronto

Occupy Toronto Protests

Occupy Toronto Protests

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20111025-occupyTO12.jpgPhotos by Tom Ryaboi

Discussion

57 Comments

Fig / October 15, 2011 at 02:52 pm
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Good photos Tom! There is a better turnout than I expected. I'm happy that the To protest is peaceful - so far at least.
Khristopher / October 15, 2011 at 03:30 pm
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That park isn't even in the financial district...
dnr / October 15, 2011 at 03:57 pm
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Eat the Rich
Machiavelli / October 15, 2011 at 04:03 pm
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Guess what. There will be poor always. There will always be a power differential. There will always be a gap between rich and poor. There will be increasing disparity as we compete globally for affordable labour and fair taxes. People who don't want to work don't deserve to share. People who can't find a job aren't being sufficiently creative. Social Darwinism is real. Utopia will never exist. Yes, criminal hedge fund managers and their kind should get whacked. But otherwise, get over it. Business, politics, and human nature are not pretty and life isn't fair.
The Tragically Flip / October 15, 2011 at 04:20 pm
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Machiavelli, how do you explain the fact that between the end of WWII and about 1980, we in the West managed to consistently decrease the gap between rich and poor, and lift millions out of poverty, while growing and prospering as a whole?

Yes there have always been poor people, but in different periods there are less or more of them and they can suffer less or more depending on the policies in place.

We can certainly do better than we're doing today, and I know that because we've already done it. Your tired cynicism is not based in reality. Poverty is solvable.


Goon / October 15, 2011 at 04:28 pm
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Machiavelli, you talk about 'darwinism' but look at what the bailouts did: They saved the asses of giant companies that should have died as punishment for the risks they took, but were decided were 'too big to fail'. And everyone else paid for it, nobody was held accountable, and the second they got the bailouts they gave themselves bonuses and spent unwisely again.

That's not darwinism. That is rewarding and socializing their failure. Smaller banks that worked fairly and wisely could have sprung up to replace them, but that isn't what happened. So don't go attacking the poor as lazy bums and accepting the status quo under such poorly thought out pretenses.

Wall Street doesn't produce anything. They just gamble. They lost at the table and got their money back. There's life being unfair, and then there's life being retarded. The system is retarded. if these protests can scare these banks and merely assure something like that bailout never happens again, they have more than done their job and have more than contributed to society.
Machiavelli replying to a comment from The Tragically Flip / October 15, 2011 at 04:40 pm
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My cynicism is reality, TTF. The reasons for the postwar economy are well studied. The West was king of the hill, called the shots, used their resources to build domestic capital and industry, and thus grew the middle class. Maybe they were better off, but the poor still existed and suffered just the same. Ever visited an inner city America ghetto? Not pretty and not much changed since 1950, except for better and more guns, more drugs, cellphones and pagers for pimps and pushers, etc. Our middle class has collapsed due to criminal financiers and global competition. Show me a civilization that has not had poverty. It is not solvable. Money and power make this planet tick, truth is. Whether due to religion, corporations, guns, disease or whatever other instrument, there will be poor always. Humanity is venal. There are few saints, and none has ever made a lasting difference in the world's condition. Some would argue the saints have cause more trouble than if they'd never existed. Reality sucks. Sorry.
J*town replying to a comment from Machiavelli / October 15, 2011 at 04:42 pm
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"People who can't find a job aren't being sufficiently creative."

Most human beings are sufficiently creative. Capitalism doesn't care about creativity unless it generates money.
Machiavelli replying to a comment from Goon / October 15, 2011 at 04:47 pm
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I agree with pretty much everything you say. Criminal bankers should be left to rot in prison. But until these criminals are penalized with either bankruptcy or incarceration, there will be no significant disincentive to that kind of behaviour. And you think these protests are going to change the power structures that protect these criminals? This ain't Paris in the 1700's. Hell, most of these protesters can't even articulate the problems they're protesting, much less suggest viable solutions to the problems. Simply another opportunity for anarchists to piss everyone off.
Alex / October 15, 2011 at 05:08 pm
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Hey, it's Down By Riverside. Nice, they're awesome.
Alex / October 15, 2011 at 05:09 pm
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Hey, it's Down By Riverside. Nice, they're awesome.
Fu / October 15, 2011 at 05:10 pm
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Yawn. Who cares. Losers. Where is my Mercedes
Fu replying to a comment from The Tragically Flip / October 15, 2011 at 05:10 pm
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Get a job
anon / October 15, 2011 at 05:26 pm
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thank god for anon.
. / October 15, 2011 at 05:37 pm
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Again, lololol at the retard torontonians that are longing for their crappy city to be like nyc.
The Tragically Flip / October 15, 2011 at 05:48 pm
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Machiavelli: "Maybe they were better off, but the poor still existed and suffered just the same."

This is a contradiction. They were better off and suffered just the same? No, it was the former. And numerous countries, from Japan to France, to the Nordic countries have maintained higher levels of social equality than us, and we do better than the US. Policy matters, and in a world with a $70T per year economy, it is possible that each and every human could have their basic needs met and more. There really is enough food and shelter for everyone, we just distribute it badly.

We escaped the malthusian cycle sometime in the mid 1800s, and we don't have to go back unless we choose to. Birth rates fell in all the richest countries, and even in the poorer ones. Malthus was wrong, but ironically the belief in his ideas can be a self-fulfilling prophecy.
The Tragically Flip replying to a comment from Fu / October 15, 2011 at 05:50 pm
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Another right winger who just hates democracy. Only people with money deserve a say in FU's world. Luckily our constitution doesn't work that way, and the unemployed count just as much as people like FU.
tim / October 15, 2011 at 06:32 pm
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That guy has a segway and wonders why he's poor???
Fu replying to a comment from The Tragically Flip / October 15, 2011 at 07:02 pm
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Tragically dumb We are governed by the charter adopted in 1984. Beardo
Fu replying to a comment from The Tragically Flip / October 15, 2011 at 07:02 pm
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More left Cottonnelle
Jer / October 15, 2011 at 07:24 pm
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I was down in the area today so I stopped by to see what was up.... It was amusing to me, what exactly are they looking for? Sure wasn't clear to me. It is easy to criticize any existing system but made some solid suggestions on how to improve things. I don't see a socialist country in the world that is better off than us. I would rather live under a capitalist system like Canada than anywhere else.
People need to realize that "corporations" are the people.. It isn't corporate greed, it is human greed. If you can solve that problem, then maybe you can make things change.
Alex.R / October 15, 2011 at 07:27 pm
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If you want perfect equality, then you need to realize that you are asking for communism; which is, living in a government that standardizes all their citizens so that everyone has an equal share of the pie. A society where everyone is the same. But no, we live in a great democracy.

The reality is that all humans have and never will be equal. I am in university and have competed athletically. Competition is everywhere and is extremely fierce. It is always survival of the fittest. This is why I personally do not give money to the homeless that are begging. It's not because I resent them or think they are trash. It's because they aren't doing anything productive by sitting there begging for money all day. Similar activities would be watching TV, surfing the web, etc. How about enrolling in social programs, improving your marketable skills, and building your personal brand. Come out and compete against me. I've noticed that it has become a tendency for people to grow really weak, many avoid struggle that involve changes in their lifestyle and that is how you stay at the bottom.
Insert Real Name / October 15, 2011 at 07:35 pm
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I think "Machiavelli" is not thinking through to the consequences of his despairing view of human nature & reality and the pointlessness of striving for improvements: it is an excellent argument for suicide. Does he have the courage for that act?
Derek replying to a comment from Goon / October 15, 2011 at 07:42 pm
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Goon's comment is RIGHT ON!
The Shakes replying to a comment from Goon / October 15, 2011 at 07:47 pm
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Your anger is only over-shadowed by your ignorance:

<i>"look at what the bailouts did: They saved the asses of giant companies that should have died as punishment for the risks they took, but were decided were 'too big to fail'"</i>
The reason for the bail outs, has absolutely nothing to do with allowing those companies to go unpunished, instead it was about preventing a world economic disaster that would actually have been far more devastating and long lasting to the 99%.

<i>"And everyone else paid for it"</i>
Actually almost all the TARP loans have been repaid with interest. Both American and Canadian taxpayers are actually net gainers.
Machiavelli replying to a comment from Insert Real Name / October 15, 2011 at 07:56 pm
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Thank you, you made me laugh! Where did I ever say that striving was pointless? Accepting the cold hard truth about how the world spins is one thing. How one deals with it is quite another. I would hope that rational people would take up the challenge, do their best, and reap their just rewards. Honestly try and you'll no doubt get a lot further than if you'd tried nothing. Suicide is for people who have given up, are not thinking clearly, and are the sick and stragglers of the herd. If you want to be like that, feel free. But my choice has always been to look to lions, not to sheep or lemmings.
1LoveTO replying to a comment from Fu / October 15, 2011 at 08:13 pm
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Hey Fu, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (adopted in 1982) was a part of the larger Constitution Act of 1982, which, along with the Constitution Act of 1867, as well as amendments and unwritten components, governs this country.
The Tragically Flip replying to a comment from Alex.R / October 15, 2011 at 08:47 pm
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"It is always survival of the fittest. This is why I personally do not give money to the homeless that are begging. It's not because I resent them or think they are trash. It's because they aren't doing anything productive by sitting there begging for money all day."

Most of human history is much more about cooperation than competition. The "fittest" were the people who worked together in families, tribes and ever larger groupings. The individuals who couldn't cooperate, lost. Society is better off if we help that homeless guy get back on his feet than we are if we leave him to starve or freeze. Best of all would be that we don't allow anyone to become homeless in the first place.

Our taxes are subsidizing your education. You drive on roads paid for us, and eat foods kept safe by government inspectors, and don't have to worry about getting sick or injured thanks to the rest of us. You think you stand on your own, but it isn't true. But that's ok, none of us do. It's just better if we realize it.
Mike Chek / October 15, 2011 at 08:59 pm
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Mike Check?
MIKE CHECK!!!
Occupy Toronto?
OCCUPY TORONTO!!!
Is filled with?
IS FILLED WITH!!!
a bunch of lemming losers?
A BUNCH OF LEMMING LOSERS!!!
Repetitive chants?
REPETITIVE CHANTS!!!
Are used to brainwash?
ARE USED TO BRAINWASH!!!
The weak minded?
THE WEAK MINDED!!
Next march Cherry Beach?
NEXT MARCH CHERRY BEACH!!!
greg / October 15, 2011 at 10:23 pm
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Dear Machiavelli;

Just because it has always been so, does not mean it always has to be.

It is that kind of thinking that was used against the civil liberties movement when they believed the system should be changed. Imagined if they were deterred by that. Every innovation in the world has met with the same resistance.

See you on the front lines tomorrow... I will be there with my wife and kids.

Greg
torontostaar replying to a comment from Jer / October 15, 2011 at 10:25 pm
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I agree with you that there wasn't any cohesive message, but in reality all of the issues that were being discussed @ st.james park today are inter connected. Yes our system is flawed, but there were speakers who layed out pretty solid solutions, such as treating corporations who are taxed very little and who lobby for/against policies that benefit themselves as legal entities that should be accountable for their actions. Currently major corps in this country, and many other capital states are essentially able to buy governments, but threatening to ship jobs overseas (which they do anyway) whenever they are told to act responsible, and in the meantime they are taxed ridiculously low. Corps need to stop hiding behind the safety blankets they've bought from governments.
polly / October 15, 2011 at 10:44 pm
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Creativity? Where? making yourselves look a fool. Bringing MTV falsified lifestyle into what you want to be a protest? Grow balls Toronto and actually make a stink, not just a mimic of what is going down in the states. If you really cared about the homeless you would offer them your bed not go and sit around in tents in a park strewn with needles and used condoms, only to get too cold and go HOME. We are not the 99% Saying that completely disregards the actual poor people in the world. They are not you and do not have your opportunities or heated furnaces. Yes there are very rich people yes there are really poor people, and the rich are sitting in their dinner parties talking about the next acquisition and reminding each other not to go downtown. That hurts the small and larger businesses when the rich stay home. CEO's do make more money, and the reason there are CEO's in the first place is because they sold you something ie:apple products that you wanted to buy. its because you put your money in the bank. Take some responsibility and actually know what you are talking about. stop living in a quote. make your own poem. The only person who has the right to say anything in this is the one who is schizophrenic living the lifestyle of a poor man.
this is not about love. this is about greed and mistaken identity.
Alex.R replying to a comment from The Tragically Flip / October 15, 2011 at 10:48 pm
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Ah yes, I've completely forgotten the social evolutionary aspect for which I thank you for reminding me about. However, to touch back on my first paragraph that refers to our government. The structure of our government is a capitalistic democracy.

Village people's perception of survival is much different than ours. Their competition was against nature and their survival was literally: life or death. Furthermore, villages had just enough people to effectively operate. The world is overpopulated and unemployment is actually a natural element to any economy. Humans are currently (and unfortunately) rulers of Earth. Thus, our competition is now only each other. Everyone is different; and consequently, such is the same for their levels of success.

If the desire is a utopia with perfect equality, the first step would be demanding the government to become communists so we can all have equal and identical rights to resources (house, food, money, technology). Unique strengths, skills, and differing levels of effort and hard work should all earn the same award.

Our reality is unfortunate, but it is what it is and the best we can do is provide access to facilities for self-improvement which already exist. From what I can manage to remember, I don't believe there are any corrupt barriers between the lower and middle class. The opportunity is there, it is up to the people to take it.

Lastly, I believe that if you dissect your life and examine it. Where you are now should be somewhat reflective of what you have done in the past.
Alex.R replying to a comment from The Tragically Flip / October 15, 2011 at 10:51 pm
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Ah yes, I've completely forgotten the social evolutionary aspect for which I thank you for reminding me about. However, to touch back on my first paragraph that refers to our government. The structure of our government is a capitalistic democracy.

Village people's perception of survival is much different than ours. Their competition was against nature and their survival was literally: life or death. Furthermore, villages had just enough people to effectively operate. The world is overpopulated and unemployment is actually a natural element to any economy. Humans are currently (and unfortunately) rulers of Earth. Thus, our competition is now only each other. Everyone is different; consequently, such is the same for their levels of success.

If the desire is a utopia with perfect equality, the first step would be demanding the government to become communists so we can all have equal and identical rights to resources (house, food, money, technology). Unique strengths, skills, and differing levels of effort and hard work should all earn the same award.

Our reality is unfortunate, but it is what it is and the best we can do is provide access to facilities for self-improvement which already exist. From what I can manage to remember, I don't believe there are any corrupt barriers between the lower and middle class. The opportunity is there, it is up to the people to take it.

Lastly, I believe that if you dissect your life and examine it. Where you are now should be somewhat reflective of what you have done in the past.
Zach Swan replying to a comment from Goon / October 15, 2011 at 11:25 pm
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That's just brilliant, Goon. You would have just let the banks die to punish a few corporate executives that made either criminal or just bad decisions. In doing so, just who do you think would have suffered the most? How about the millions of people who would have lost their jobs as a result? Of the millions of people of all levels of wealth who actually own the shares of those institutions through their pensions, investments, RRSPs, etc? Try to think a little deeper before you spout nonsense.
b replying to a comment from polly / October 16, 2011 at 02:20 am
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ya know she's got a point in some way..
MacKenna / October 16, 2011 at 02:31 am
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Having read all of Machiavelli's comments I can't find a single useful contribution. He makes a big deal out of "being a realist" as if that's a claim to fame or some grand achievement. Hell, most of us are "realists" as we slog through our days working and paying the bills. But Machiavelli, as far as I can see, doesn't contribute a damn thing to society except bitch and whine endlessly about how much better he is than everybody else.

Here's what I can't understand. Inside of his social darwinist theory, how does a complete tool like him survive? Grifting?
MacKenna / October 16, 2011 at 02:33 am
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I encourage Zach Swan and the other idiots who aren't understanding the grift and scams on Wall Street to read Griftopia by Matt Taibbi. Until you've done that and you know something about the bailouts, the bonuses, the scam engineered by Goldman Sachs, and the bubble profiteering helped along by Alan Greenspan over decades, you need to shut up. Because you don't know what you are talking about.
JD / October 16, 2011 at 05:10 am
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I hope each and every one of the protestors are voters.
doubtit / October 16, 2011 at 08:11 am
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I doubt it, less and less people are voting these days.

the people that are effected the most are the working families. Which don't have time to sit around in a park and sing songs. No they have to work and support their families even on a weekend. These people do not represent me in any way.
utopia replying to a comment from JD / October 16, 2011 at 08:23 am
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I dont think what is going on is going to make any difference. I think JD makes a good point. There are other ways to stand up for your rights that are more productive. For example, vote, dont shop at huge department stores like walmart, hire minorities. Its not so much that they are taking our power but in fact we are giving it to them. I think this"occupy" is an interesting idea but I dont think it is going to accomplish much. I think energy could be much more effectively used.
Maybe someone can help me out, what do they wish to accomplish with these protests?
I just dont understand this?
Zach Swan replying to a comment from MacKenna / October 16, 2011 at 08:33 am
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I encourage the clearly retarded MacKenna to buff up on his/her reading comprehension. I clearly stipulated that the corp execs involved may have acted in a criminal way. That is irrelevant. The simple point was that letting those huge organizations fail would have done far more harm to the 'common man' than the execs. They've already paid for their mansions with the big bonuses. The ones who will be hurt the worst are the ones getting their paycheques from those institutions and the others that would fail as a result; the ones who would lose their retirement savings because they held shares in those companies, etc. etc. So until you get a clue MacKenna, it is you that should shut up.
pdalep / October 16, 2011 at 09:16 am
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Its not capitalism, its become corporatism. Its unethical for leaders to be making 2000x more in wages then the lowest paid in the same company. . I could understand 50x or 100x. But nobody is worth 2000x more then anyone else. That's plain unethical. This level of greed is unsustainable .
n / October 16, 2011 at 09:51 am
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Here's an idea: most of us are working and are therefore unable to participate in these demos or otherwise not able to spend the night outside. How about a 10 minute protest during the work day in front of each workplace? Just people going out and showing their dissatisfaction with the current state of things. This would work well downtown and uptown where you have huge buildings with lots of employees. I am sure a few hundred would gather in front of each building. That would send a clear message that a lot of people are fed up. Just my 2 cents.
scott / October 16, 2011 at 10:29 am
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I hate this dilution of the energies of the left. While this is going on, Rob Ford is still mayor, and there is something very specific to fight for right here. Taking on corporate greed is always a good idea, but taking on Rob Ford is something _achievable_. Recently, we've seen how focused and rational activism can succeed: Doug Ford's ridiculous Port Lands idea was squashed, and the service cuts have been fought back very effectively so far. However, now what is happening; the people who should be focused on continuing this fight are now off sleeping in a park and parading around the financial district and taking on a huge array of issues, some of which are specific but most of which are vague and even contradictory. People across the political spectrum have been turning against Rob Ford, but I worry very much that this "Occupation" will end up polarizing the city again, so that those in the middle and right will begin to see it Rob Ford's way once more. There is a real danger here of losing the momentum that has taken all summer long to achieve.

Also, for god's sake, why are they sleeping in a public park? City Council just voted to set back the time table for it's Tree Canopy increases, and people on the left are risking damage to one of the best parks downtown?! Go camp out in the actual Financial District if you must! Ironically, some of the people who most benefit from St. James Park are those from the Salvation Army place on Jarvis a block away. The people being kicked out of the park are exactly the people most hurt by rising inequity. If anyone has a right to protest, it is they. But of course, if they camp out somewhere, it won't be in expensive tents, and they won't be able to broadcast their exploits to the whole world via the cameras on their iphones.
dc / October 16, 2011 at 10:58 am
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what's funny is that 99% of these "protestors" are part of the 1%, go home hippies, it's cold out there
Marlboro Man replying to a comment from n / October 16, 2011 at 11:49 am
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I believe that's called a smoke break.
warmflash / October 16, 2011 at 12:21 pm
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Great photographs. Really great stuff! Keep on documenting this event. Best!
Marlon replying to a comment from utopia / October 16, 2011 at 12:26 pm
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A lot of despair and name calling on here. This is about showing solidarity with new York plain and simple. Canada was able to weather the storm because our banks are regulated. Americans want their banks regulated. Dodd frank (regulating wall street) was sitting on a back burner the occupy movement is working to make it a priority. I didn't know what Dodd frank was before this movement now most people paying attention do. There is an election coming up in America. OWS have made these matters big election issues. They wouldn't have been otherwise. This isn't about solving all of the worlds problems. It's about taking baby steps towards a less corrupt system. Despair is weak.
Jamie Smith / October 16, 2011 at 02:24 pm
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The percussion group in the video is Samba Elegua - check us at www.sambaelegua.com

We wanted to play Occupy TO to support people putting economic injustice on the agenda in Canada. It's not fair that a few people earn such a large proportion of the money.
Everyone else works hard too and should not be getting poorer every year when banks, oil companies etc have record profits year after year. This has been a dramatic, historic shift in Canada in the last 20 years where the top couple percent of income earners are getting richer faster than ever, while everyone else's incomes stagnate or lower. It's not right, it's not good for our economy or society, and it needs to change.
Solidarity to all supporters of OTO, and thanks for blogging about it, blogTO!
Joe / October 16, 2011 at 05:13 pm
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My point being: you need to identify your enemy if you want to win the war.
w. replying to a comment from . / October 16, 2011 at 10:48 pm
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@. (trust me as a NYC native....NO ONE in Toronto wants to be like NY. this city is watching what happens down there.) The world is protesting right now- does Rome want to be NYC as well?
Alex E / October 17, 2011 at 01:10 pm
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Good luck to the protestors. I hope this movement can help push the rest of the world to regulate their industries more, especially the financial sector.

When I first heard of this movement I was unsure of the point, because Canada's financial sector is fine and fairly regulated. But now that they have moved away from Bay Street and are protesting greed in general I hope they help make changes.
Mark / October 17, 2011 at 04:44 pm
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Only sane guy there was holding the "Karl Marx was wrong" sign.
James Cameron is King / October 28, 2011 at 01:07 pm
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The scepter of the wicked will not remain over the land allotted to the righteous, for then the righteous might use their hands to do evil. Psalm 125:3

The scepter of the wicked, a.k.a. of the Viking hoarder races of the Free (I should say GREED) World.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norse_funeral
James Cameron is King / October 28, 2011 at 01:07 pm
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The scepter of the wicked will not remain over the land allotted to the righteous, for then the righteous might use their hands to do evil. Psalm 125:3

The scepter of the wicked, a.k.a. of the Viking hoarder races of the Free (I should say GREED) World.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norse_funeral
Darren Tobias replying to a comment from utopia / November 16, 2011 at 09:53 pm
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Thats a Statement now that would be heard, Not shopping in the Giant Stores, buying only in the little guys huts, with Christmas Shopping coming up, They would hear that more then you Occupying a Park.

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