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Do you give money to door-to-door charity canvassers?

Posted by Guest Contributor / March 12, 2011

Canvassers TorontoThe following post was written by guest contributor Jose Gonzalez who briefly worked for a company in Toronto that hired him to go door-to-door seeking donations for charity. He underscores that not all of these companies are bad, but that everyone should be rightly sceptical and do their research before handing over money at the door. We thought this post is particularly timely given the recent tragedy in Japan.

The toughest part isn't having someone tell you that they don't care about starving orphans or getting trapped in a conversation with an old racist man. The most dreadful part of work as a canvasser in a mulit-level-marketing company is the dirty feeling you get from lying to everyone you meet.

Not all canvassers are trying to mislead the people they talk to, but while working for a less reputable company, I did learn a few ways in which idealistic young employees are tricked into lying for what seems like a worthy cause. The campaign I was assigned to work on was a charity collecting for victims of hurricanes and earthquakes.

The pitch begins by being overly friendly, always wearing a smile regardless of the weather. Then you'll get a problem of some kind, in my case it was helping people in Haiti, and very casually that will be followed by a solution that usually involves you signing up for a donation plan.

Regardless of how many people anyone would talk to in a day, you'll invariably hear how helpful all your neighbours have been, a powerful psychological trick called the Jones effect which is designed to make you feel like you need to keep up with potentially more charitable neighbours. Other techniques are smalltalk, painfully scripted jokes, and even some flirting.

Of course, these are all old sales tricks, where things started getting weird was when I was encouraged not to let anyone know I was earning a commission. Obviously a red flag for a charity worker, so I was taught all sorts of half-truths to ensure no one would know I would make anything off their donation like saying "I'm currently working for free" before someone signs up, which is when I'd actually earn the commission.

The commissions were higher than the initial donations, but this would supposedly be offset by monthly donations over time. To improve our numbers and to earn a nice commission, we'd tell people to sign up for one month, and then cancel right away, meaning a huge portion of the donation isn't going to the charity.

One question I was constantly asked was if instead of signing up a donation through me, they could instead make it online. It'd obviously be easier to do that instead of giving financial info to a complete stranger, but I was instructed to tell them that by donating through me, a corporate sponsor would triple match their donation, which you couldn't do online. I later learned that this special promotion was just as available online, and I was essentially lying to improve my company's image through a lot of direct sign-ups.

Not all canvassers are out to trick you out of your money, but it's important to know what might be happening to your money if you choose to donate, so try to make sure anyone who comes to your door isn't working for a marketing group and doesn't have a commission at stake.

Do you give money to door-to-door canvassers? Share your experience and opinions in the comments below.

Photo by RPM on Flickr

Discussion

39 Comments

Nirg / March 12, 2011 at 12:18 pm
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Door-to-door canvassers aren't welcome at my house and I get a lot of pleasure from chasing them out of my property, whatever they're selling. I'm extremely picky as to which charities I give money to since I've actually worked in that industry and what I saw utterly disgusted me. Did you know that most "charities" take a 70% cut out of all donations to supposedly pay for their administration? Sorry, but I'd rather give goods and services than money.
Jakson / March 12, 2011 at 12:51 pm
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Never! And i don't give to street corner canvasseurs either. I choose the charities I wish to give to. I don't let them choose me.
Rahim / March 12, 2011 at 01:31 pm
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I worked with a third-party fundraiser for four years (and was the recruiter for the company in the last several months) The one I worked with, though it has it's flaws, is non-commission, with a guaranteed wage (which allows for a higher ethical standard in the communication, and less of pressure tactics) If you take a look at a lot of the reports dealing with third-party fundraisers, they'll paint this horrible picture of how much of costs go to administration, but in terms of my former employer, anywhere from 70 to 80% of any funds they generate will go right into a program, with very low costs in administration (a lot of small charities unfortunately have to compete for donation dollars so it causes such a high admin cost)

Now again, my former employer may have their flaws, but when it comes to the ethical standards of their fundraisers, and their genuine passion, trust me when I say there's a big difference between them, and the commission-based companies out there (if someone from Public Outreach interacts with you, listen to them - they are the only non-commissioned based company in the city, truly) I went door-to-door for three years, so I know the business.

As a donor myself, just ask questions. I still work with charities and every single one will tell you they want long-term commitment, and that ultimately means being respectful of the donor (which is why commission-based fundraising doesn't work) Ask about the company the canvasser works with - they should have the company name on the badge, so if you're engaged, call the number (definitely call the charity as well - they'll be happy to speak with you) A good canvasser will WANT you to do that - a good canvasser will be patient, respectful, understanding and not guilt-trip you, and whether or not you can or wish to give, it doesn't hurt to listen.

Hope that helps!

Lisa / March 12, 2011 at 01:58 pm
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I think that door-to-door and street-ambush charity solicitors are predatory and I never give to them. In fact, when I see a particular organization that I might otherwise donate toward employing these tactics, I take note NOT to contribute to them anymore/in the future.
Easy Peasy / March 12, 2011 at 02:25 pm
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Canvasser: Would you like to donate to XXX?

Me: (lying) I already do.

Canvasser: Oh.

Me: Bye bye.

The end.


Alex / March 12, 2011 at 02:42 pm
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Charity muggers should be illegal. Period.

Not only does the marketing company that sends them forth take a huge chunk of whatever you donate (don't bother asking them, the door to door or street people are told to lie) but I can't walk ten feet without somebody trying to flag me down for yet another cause.

Not to mention that everywhere you donate to sells your info to others so they can all go after you for money. (if you've ever wondered why you donate to UNICEF and then get direct mailings from eight other charities, that's why)

As a result, sadly, I no longer donate to charity in any way shape or form.
Danielle / March 12, 2011 at 03:20 pm
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The only time I've had an insightful conversation with a canvasser was a door to door one. She was from TEA (Toronto Environmental Alliance) and we actually talked about a few issues and while I refrained from donating I did signup for a newsletter and sign a local petition for an issue in my neighbourhood. She was very invested in the group and the environment and was knowledgeable, I really appreciated her dedication.

If I had the money, I think I would have actually signed up through her, if I was able to provide payment securely, which is the major barrier for most I think.
James / March 12, 2011 at 03:35 pm
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No never.

Charities that sell my address never get another dime either.

There are way too many questionable charities often mixing personal interests or political goals with their good works. I will only donate when I have direct knowledge what the money will be going to.
Rahim / March 12, 2011 at 03:42 pm
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To clarify a few things, not every charity or third-party fundraiser trades information (let's not paint everyone with the same brush) Again, where I worked, it's a company policy to not trade information with anyone, and we'd only work with companies that followed such guidelines (and donors can make the request right on the sign-up sheet just to be clear about it)

In terms of payment security, the three digit code on the back of a credit card is never taken, and some companies do have electronic sign-up devices (something you'd use at any store) Donor security is of a high priority.

I can understand hesitation, but again, there are perfectly legitimate, effective operations out there doing this kind of work, and if you go to the charities directly, they'll tell you in crystal clear detail the positive reasons for this kind of outreach (and even show you numbers/data to prove it) At my previous company, one lie to a donor would be enough to merit dismissal.

For me, I couldn't hire someone unless they were passionate about the causes they'd represent. I wouldn't want anyone to 'fake' it. I knew that those people would be genuine, and represent with integrity. It doesn't mean there aren't bad experiences and bad fundraisers with low or no ethics out there.

For all the bad ones, though, there are genuinely good ones, doing honest work, and helping.

Again, be informed. Of course be critical, but if you're genuinely interested in giving, talk to the charities and they'll be happy to dialogue with you about any matter related to fundraising.
John / March 12, 2011 at 03:46 pm
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I worked for one of these places once. I was lied at in the interview and was told that the job would entail doing presentations to the community on behalf various charities and was also told I would be doing marketing and consulting for charities. I get there, and it turns out they lied to me.

Honestly, if anyone is considering getting into this, do your research. I quit my job and moved to Mississauga for this job because they were so convincing. Instead of what they told me I was going to do, the job turned out to be going door-to-door and begging people to sign up to sponsor whatever charity (i.e. Sick Kids). They dropped me off in a suburb in Mississauga and came back 8 hours later to pick me up. I also was told I would get paid 40 dollars whenever someone signed on for the year. This was all the money I would be paid, so if I didn't get anyone to sign up, I would get no money.

I was told that if someone said they already donated to the charity, I had to say that someone down the street also already donates but decided to donate double the amount in order to guilt them into it. Needless to say I never came back after that first day...

It was such a scam, for me, for the people donating, and for the charities.
David / March 12, 2011 at 08:17 pm
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The canvasser from TEA drops by my house once a year, we have a chat and I write them a cheque. I do, however, already know a great deal about the organization, so it's not really soliciting. Note that TEA is not a charity, it's an advocacy group and hence your donation does not qualify for a tax credit.

I have on occasion turned down someone at the door and after further investigation made a donation.

Generally I try to turn the solicitor down gently as in general I don't approve of door to door solicitation.
Vivian / March 12, 2011 at 10:42 pm
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I keep my screen door locked, say that I do not contribute to door to door and please leave the materials in my mailbox. I then have the time to investigate if they leave anything at all.
databases / March 13, 2011 at 11:36 am
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If you DON'T want a charity to contact you, you need to ask staff to change your donor record. Most fundraising databases have an area designated for preferred methods of communications and related restrictions. You can donate by phone and make the request as you're donating.
Daniel / March 13, 2011 at 01:56 pm
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I only donate currently to two places: my church and through my taxes.

my multi-level government is good at writing cheques to those less fortunate; so I can be sure that my taxes are going to pay for something somewhere in the world.

be it through TCHC or Haiti relief efforts, the government is always there willing to write cheques on my behalf. thanks government!
taylor / March 14, 2011 at 08:51 am
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when i briefly worked for public outreach as a street canvasser, it wasn't a commissions-based pay structure, but if you didn't secure a certain amount of pre-authorized monthly payments in a given month, you'd just be fired. this definitely leads to a certain desperation on the part of canvassers, which i think accounts for why some are so aggressive, and even dishonest.
Kate / March 14, 2011 at 12:41 pm
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Please continue to by Girl Guide cookies!
GG Cookies and Scout apples are always welcome at my house so long as a child is the "vendor" at my door.
After that, I don't answer my door if i don't know who you are.
Leaving flyers behind if I'm not home is littering in my mind.
Tim / March 14, 2011 at 03:13 pm
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There are a million reasons to NOT give to charity, which we invente in an effort to make us feel better about not giving. VERY few charities have less than 75% of the money going to programmes, leaving most around 20-25% for fundraising and admin. News flash: money doesn't appear out of thin air, and asking people to make monthly donations requires some level of expertise. As we all know, there are tonnes of smart, charismatic, talented people out there who have all the money in the world, so why don't we just get more of them to donate their lives to charity? Why are we wasting our time paying smart, charistmatic, talented NORMAL (i.e. not rich) people to do a good thing anyway? I'm sure if we wait long enough, enough money will appear, and those annoying charities will stop asking for money because there will be no more disasters and wars. Oh right... reality...

No matter how you sign up (commission vs. non-commission) KEEP GIVING. Don't sign up if you don't believe in the cause, and don't sign up if you're unwilling or unable to keep doing it. Charities NEED money, and helping people in need is a very important thing to do. People around the world die everyday needlessly and it's very sad to read some of these comments. Everyday, children die from Diarrhea you know...

Grace / March 14, 2011 at 03:22 pm
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Why are people afraid and defensive? Stay informed about the charities and ask questions...those who are honest with you and not smarmy and using the "jones effect", when you ask the pressing questions, and are representing reputable charities are out there typically because they care about the organizations. The boards of the reputable charities look at ROI, cost effectiveness etc. Stay informed, ask questions, use your instincts and for the most part, treat the fundraisers as people because most are doing it for the right reasons. Those that are smarmy, avoiding questions for information, and aren't open to a respectful q&a should be put into question.
Of course the person who didn't make money for the charity for a month no longer had a job...that would negate the idea of cost effectiveness but the happy and relaxed fundraisers that come to my door still look like they are having a pretty good time even if there's a conversation, an offer of a drink of water or tea and I still say that I am not interested in donating.

Vikki / March 14, 2011 at 04:09 pm
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I can't understand all the hate for giving in general in this posting. I was a canvasser for PO and Rahim was the one who hired me, and I spent an hour talking to him about charities and he got me so excited about the job I almost started crying with joy to do it, and I could see he meant every word, and when my supervisors trained me, I could tell they were genuine about the work and that the paycheck wasn't what it was about, and even though I didn't make it through my evaluation, it made me realize how important this work is, and people need to stop looking at it as like we're intruders or trespassers - people die everyday and I don't care if you're commission or non-commission, just give. If you don't like canvassers, fine, but don't start hating on all charities in general, seriously.
Trotter overhead door / March 15, 2011 at 01:13 am
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I think more people would be willing to give money to charity if they knew that the money they gave actually made it to the cause. Even some of the well know charities are scams like U2's charity where only like 3% makes it to the cause.
dogood / March 15, 2011 at 02:47 pm
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Giving to charities is important. The VAST majorities out there are legitimate and generally at least 75 - 90% of donations go to programs.

The Canadian Revenue Agency has guidelines for how much a charity can spend on fundraising and administration - if charities do not abide by the rules, they loose their charitable status. Also, all registered charities are required to disclose their financial data on the Canadian Revenue Agency website. If you're unsure about a particular charity, look them up.

I realize this may be difficult to do with a canvasser at your door, but that could be part of the process. The canvasser could be the initial outreach that gets you acquainted with a particular charity. After speaking to them for a while, get their information, research the charity online, then make a donation to the charity directly – make sure to referr to the canvasser who started the whole process.
Eddie Brock / March 15, 2011 at 03:26 pm
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I answer the door naked so there's awkwardness which makes them just leave without me having to say a word.
Jessica / July 17, 2011 at 02:53 am
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I've noticed a lot of people are complaining about door to door visits from charities... but its not just charities that go door to door. Some people in tight spots to make ends meet have to go door to door to come up with what they need to pay their own bills. I'm thinking about going door to door myself in order to cover a medical procedure I need done that my health insurance will not cover. Also, girl scouts and boy scouts have been known to go door to door as well. I suggest before shoving them off your property, listen to what they say... if people gave others a chance, they wouldnt have to lie about why they are there. Also, isnt someone ringing your doorbell better then your phone ringing off the hook with telemarketers asking for your credit card info. At best, offer them a quarter if they have a jar. Anything is better than nothing at all.
scissorhands replying to a comment from Easy Peasy / August 25, 2011 at 01:00 am
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Obviously you have no idea what you are talking about.
If it is not a scam, and is a real door to door charity like Greenpeace or the Wilderness Committee, they will have your past supporter information. So you can't say "I already donate," because they will know you are making it up.

Why not just say no? Passive agressive people have issues!
chronic / January 27, 2012 at 04:47 pm
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Just turned away SickKids today. Don't feel the least bit bad.

Found this article via searching "windsor ontario sick kids door to door canvassing"
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Carly replying to a comment from Rahim / April 11, 2012 at 09:07 pm
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Thanks for the info! I was doing some searching on the net since I have an interview with Public Outreach tomorrow. I like what I have seen so far and am excited to have a shot at an opportunity at canvassing. I really have a heart to help people!
Carly replying to a comment from Vikki / April 11, 2012 at 09:11 pm
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That's right! There's people in this world that have it allot worse than we do! We Canadians are fortunate!
Candice replying to a comment from Carly / April 19, 2012 at 05:37 pm
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Hi Carly!

I have an interview with Pubic Outreach soon too! Not sure if it's worth going for seeing so many scam marketing companies like Vector and Simple Concepts. Please let me how it went and whether it's worth to invest my summer in! :)
Carly / April 20, 2012 at 01:22 pm
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Hi Candice!

I sent you a response to your e-mail address, check it out.
Carly replying to a comment from Rahim / April 20, 2012 at 01:56 pm
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Hi Rahim,

I did not get the opportunity for street and door-to-door fund raising with Public Outreach they had so many candidates that they just chose the best ones, but I was told that I could re-aply. I am passionate about raising money for causes that help people directly causes such as Because I Am A Girl.

Seeing as you have worked in this field for awhile do you have any advice and information for me on how to get started in something like this? I started my own faith based outreach in August 2011 to women in Toronto Canada, and the surrounding area, who work in adult establishments who want to leave the industry and turn their lives around. I also desire to reach out to victims of human trafficking.

Thank you!
Carly replying to a comment from Carly / April 20, 2012 at 02:25 pm
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Candice,

Sorry about the misunderstanding I thought that I was responding to your e-mail address.

I was not chosen for the opportunity at Public Outreach, I did not get to research them as much as I would have liked to but to the best of my discernment they look legitimate. See if you can talk with people who have worked there (try looking on linkedin and if you are not on there yet I recommend setting up a profile it's exclusively for professional networking). Do a google search on them and check youtube as well to see what people are saying. After doing these things if you like what you see and hear then definitely go with them for the summer.

As for the interview it was a group interview, it was relaxed and casual. They are looking for candidates whom they are confident will have no problem flagging down people on the street to enthusiastically tell them about the cause for which they are fund raising. On the application form they ask you which causes you would like to do fund raising for as well as the ones you don't want. We were given a test at the close of the interview to go out on the street to collect signatures for a petition: the goal isn't to see who can get them the fastest but just for the recruiter to see how you interact with people.

I hope that I have been helpful to you!
Michelle replying to a comment from Carly / May 8, 2012 at 07:49 pm
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Hi Carly, I know this is a late response but I just had an interview with Public Outreach today and I was wondering if you partook in training? And if you didn't was there a reason why? They didn't really say if I got the job or not, but just that training starts next week and that they will call me tomorrow. I don't know what to make of that.
Thanks!

Carly / May 8, 2012 at 08:59 pm
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Hi Michelle,

Did they tell you that they would call you back as to whether you are hired or not or did they say that they would call you to begin training? If they did not mention training specifically for you then they will call you to let you know if you were hired.

I did not get a call either and had to call their hiring office to see what was going on: in my case I was not hired because they had so many applicants to choose from that they just chose the best ones. I never did face to face fundraising before so I chock it up to my lack of experience that put me at the bottom of the many people to choose from but then it could have just been someone who really was better than me, who knows? The guy on the phone at the recruiting department told me that they chose the best applicants and that they choose ones who they believe will have no problem flagging down people to talk with them about the cause and do it with enthusiasm.

I am still going to look into face to face fundraising opportunities, I'm sure that someone will want to bring me on board and train me. By the way if you want to include me in your list of professional networks I have a linkedin profile here's my link http://www.linkedin.com/in/carolcarlyfournier
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Jak / July 6, 2013 at 12:57 pm
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I am a canvasser. I do it to earn a wage as right now I am finding it impossible to find a job, and instead of sitting on my BACKSIDE claiming all state benefits I can (like most people) I'm out there trying to earn an honest living. I do not lie, my customers know I work on commission without even having to ask and the charity I work for get 75p of every pound raised. The other 25p goes two ways; 1) to fund advertisement (myself, newspaper etc) and 2) run the lottery of the charity I am helping to raise so the charity also gives back to the local community.

Grow the hell up. We are out there EARNING A LIVING! NOT CLAIMING BENIFITS! GIVE US A BREAK!
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