Haliburton Sculpture Forest

There's a forest full of sculptures in Ontario

There's a magical place in Ontario that is hailed as one of the province's best kept secrets.

This whimsical spot, known as the Haliburton Sculpture Forest in Glebe Park, makes you feel like you've entered some kind of fairy tale, where giant art installations seem to pop up around every bend.

This unique collection of nearly 40 sculptures has been built by a community of International and Canadian artists, and are sporadically arranged along the trail systems that line Head Lake.

Haliburton Sculpture Forest opened in 2001, and started with just three sculptures in the beginning.

Its mission is to create a destination for residents, visitors and tourists, which highlight the visual arts in Haliburton County. Now, the park boasts 37 sculptures of all sizes that reflect the changing Ontario seasons.

Some of the most popular (and frequently photographed) sculptures include a giant red stiletto, a towering psychedelic-coloured leaf, a blue horse, and antique mirrors hanging off trees—making it an appropriate place to "reflect" and "find yourself."

The mix of colour, art materials, and sheer size of some of the sculptures make the entire park a photographer's dream.

For a complete guide to all the sculptures, and to view a map of where each resides within the park, check the website.  

The Haliburton Sculpture Forest is open year-round, is dog-friendly, and admission is a donation that funds the initiative. Be sure to check their COVID-19 protocols before you go.

Lead photo by

Patty Ho


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