The Hour One Million Acts of Green

The Hour's One Million Acts of Green

I recycle. I bring my own bag. I light my apartment with CFLs. I try to eat local, and I'm vegetarian (most of the time). And I was thrilled when I heard George Stroumboulopoulos announce that he will officially launch of The Hour's "One Million Acts of Green" (OMAOG) campaign this Tuesday.

The OMAOG movement is welcome news after the disappointment of last week's election results. Now that we've re-appointed a government whose policies represent a significant threat to environmental issues, our individual efforts are even more crucial in making our community a little - or a lot - greener.

The City seems to want us to act, too, by using rate increases and fines to motivate residents to recycle and conserve. Torontonians will face a 9 percent increase in water prices next year, and an increase of the same amount every year through 2012. The Ontario Energy Board is raising basic electricity rates by more than 10 percent. And if we don't use our blue and green bins, we could face a $105 ticket from the City.

The Hour's interactive OMAOG website will launch Tuesday, where people can register their "acts of green." Until the end of the show's season next June, George will challenge Canadians and other CBC programs to commit to lightening their environmental footprints.

I'll be kicking off my million acts of green by recycling an old halogen floor lamp for cash. Canadian Tire is taking back old air conditioners, dehumidifiers, and halogen lamps in exchange for gift cards on October 25 and 26 as part of the Ontario Power Authority's Every Kilowatt Counts campaign.

Photo from pinksox on Flickr.


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