contact tracing toronto

Here are the rules for contact tracing at Toronto bars and restaurants right now

The rules for contact tracing at Toronto bars and restaurants seem simple at first but upon closer inspection, some people are having a little trouble figuring them out.

Some customers are even flat out refusing to give out their contact info, which is just not helpful at all. Contact tracing is used to notify people if they may have been exposed to COVID-19 so the risk of spreading it to others can be mitigated as quickly as possible.

The Toronto Public Health reopening guide states restaurants and bars must record the name(s) and contact information for every party who enters an indoor or outdoor dining area in the establishment.

That means the rules apply both to patio and indoor dining.

But what about takeout? Or other people entering the restaurants simply to pay for or pick up an order?

According to the rules, takeout customers or Uber Eats drivers are not subject to contact tracing so do not need to hand over contact info like dine-in customers do.

But what about a group of people sitting at one table? Do all of them need to hand over their info for contact tracing purposes?

According to the rules, only a single person in a group needs to give the restaurant or bar their contact info.

According to Toronto Public Health spokesperson Dr. Vinita Dubey, restaurants and bars are required to "maintain a customer log that: records customer information, in a legible manner, consisting of the name, email address and telephone number of at least one person from each party."

contact tracing toronto

The most recent notice about contact tracing from the City of Toronto.

This is all covered by the City of Toronto's By-law 665-2020, an amendment to the City's Municipal Code Chapter 545, Licensing with respect to reducing the risk from COVID-19 at establishments serving food and drink.

The date, check in and check out times, and seating location also have to be recorded by the bar or restaurant.

These records then have to be kept for a month, and this information can only be disclosed to a Medical Officer of Health or an inspector.

Restaurants and bars should also post a notice of collection sign and use a customer log template, both available on the City website.

Lead photo by

Fareen Karim at Egg Bird


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