toronto patios

Toronto begins to close off curb lanes to build patios on the street

The first curb lane closures went into effect today as part of the city's CafeTO program meant to help local restaurants and bars create more space for physical distancing.

This new program, part of Stage 2 of the city’s reopening, was approved by City Council on June 29 to safely and quickly expand outdoor dining space for local restaurants and create room for physical distancing and stress-free patio enjoyment during the summer months.

A CafeTO Placement Guidebook was created for businesses to better understand program requirements and other details necessary for the safe installation of a temporary sidewalk cafe, according to the City of Toronto website.

The City is working closely with restaurant and bar operators to help them understand enforcement, safety accessibility requirements, and how to maintain physical distancing in order to keep all customers and employees safe.

Restaurant and bar owners have several options they can choose from in order to participate in the CafeTO program such as: installing a patio in the curb lane, installing a patio on the sidewalk, or expanding an existing patio on the sidewalk.

Restaurants and bars interested in installing a sidewalk or curb lane patio need to have a letter of permission from their property owner, as well as a certificate of insurance, Toronto Eating Establishment License Number, and a City of Toronto Cafe Permit Number. 

Lead photo by

Josh Matlow


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