Athletes Kitchen Toronto

Athlete's Kitchen

Athlete's Kitchen started out as meal prep service before debuting a retail location in Liberty Village.

The take-out food counter joins similarly health-focused eateries in the neighbourhood including Oats & Ivy and Freshii , but the competition isn't a deterrent for owners Oscar and Yalda Naziri. The neighbourhood is also flourishing with crossfit studios and gyms, and the husband and wife team already has a customer base who order prepackaged meals regularly.

Athletes Kitchen Toronto

The retail storefront replaces the commercial kitchen the two had been renting in Mississauga since launch in March 2015. From a customer perspective, the space consists simply of an ordering counter and a cold case packed with ready-to-eat meals. Meanwhile the kitchen in the back has introduced a menu of hot foods made to order.

The Naziris personal interests in all things fitness and clean eating is what spurred the business. When we talk there's no mention of professional nutritionist involvement, but the Paleo diet is an obvious influence and the menus they promote are free of preservatives, gluten, added sweeteners, salt and dairy.

Athletes Kitchen Toronto

Geared towards a fitness-obsessed clientele, offerings include pre and post workout options in the form of breakfasts and shakes. There's protein waffles ($7.95) and power (steel cut oat) bowls ($6.95) as well as protein shakes ($6.95) like the anti-oxidant blast featuring a blend of acai, berries and iso-hydrolyzed (or vegan) vanilla powder.

athletes kitchen toronto

More substantial meals from the kitchen include a choice of five entrees like the Lean Machine ($12.50), a grilled chicken breast over quinoa with chopped kale, roasted sweet potatoes, avocado, broccoli, shredded cabbage and pickled red onions.

Despite the entirely intentional lack of seasoning, it's quite good. The chicken is moist and lightly infused with flavours from the grill while the Sriracha lime dressing really perks up the veg.

Athletes Kitchen Toronto

The Bulk Burger ($11.50) is a satisfying substitution to a hamburger. I was already craving a burger (an urge spurred as I passed Harvey's and Hero Burger on the walk over), and it was unexpected that this lean beef patty nestled into cabbage leaves adequately sated the craving. Sides of sweet potato wedges, pickles, slaw and a house-made sun dried tomato ketchup complete the combo.

athletes kitchen toronto

I sample some of the sweets on offer too. The sweet potato brownie ($3.50) is not my thing; the texture is too fudgey and not cakey enough.

Athletes Kitchen Toronto

The fresh from the oven paleo cookie ($1.95) made with almond flour, almond butter, eggs, coconut sugar, oil and cocoa is, however, perfect. It's crunchy and just slightly sweet - I'd eat this over traditional baked goods any day.

Athletes Kitchen Toronto

Had I only eaten a salad or some low-carb alternative I would have most like given in to the addictive power of a greasy burger on my way out of Liberty Village. Truthfully I left too full to even think of eating junk food.

Athletes Kitchen Toronto

Photos by Hector Vasquez.


Athlete's Kitchen

Leaflet | © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap Improve this map

Join the conversation Load comments

Latest Reviews

PanPan Noodle Bar

The Fix Ice Cream Bar

Joe Bird

Godspeed Brewery

Wilson's Haus of Lechon

Rita's Italian Ice