david bowie toronto

Toronto's Skratch Bastrid pays homage to David Bowie

David Bowie had an enormous influence on artists worldwide, so it's no surprise that musicians right here in Toronto are paying tribute to the Starman.

Locally based DJ and producer Skratch Bastid put up a video last night where he remixed Bowie's 1983 hit "Let's Dance." His nearly two minute routine already has more than 8.5 million views on Facebook and close to 30,000 on YouTube.

"I think the most appropriate way for a DJ to celebrate my favourite artists is by sharing their music," he wrote on both Facebook and YouTube. "So how about a little routine?"

Tonight, the band Holy Holy - which features Bowie collaborators Tony Visconti and Mick "Woody" Woodmansey - will perform as scheduled at the Opera House on Queen Street East. They'll play Bowie's 1970 The Man Who Sold The World album in its entirety. And, the group has now added a second show, slated for January 13 at the same venue.

If you're itching to watch Jareth the Goblin King in The Labyrinth, you won't find it on Canadian Netflix. The Kingsway Movie Theatre, however, will be screening it at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday as well as at 9:25 p.m. this Saturday night.

While it may be covered up by snow now, local sidewalk chalk artist Victor Fraser wrote "David Bowie Forever" in a massive mural just outside the Horseshoe Tavern.


Have you discovered other ways Toronto artists and musicians are paying homage to David Bowie? Share them in the comments.


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