bike lanes toronto

One of Toronto's most dangerous streets for cyclists is getting protected bike lanes

One of Toronto's oldest commuter bike lanes — also known for being one of the most dangerous is in the city — is finally getting a makeover. 

On Nov. 5, the infrastructure and environment committee considered and passed a plan to give the Dundas Street East bike lanes between Broadview Avenue and Kingston Road an upgrade. The lanes were installed in 2003 and are dangerously situated between the travel lane and parked cars.

The plan includes installing barriers (also known as cycle tracks) to finally ensure bikers using the lanes are protected from both parked and moving vehicles. 

According to a report outlining the proposed changes from the general manager of Transportation Services, approximately 2,500 cyclists travel on the Dundas Street East bike lanes each day, along with 10,000 to 15,000 motor vehicles. 

"Dundas Street East is an arterial roadway with a posted speed limit of 40 km/hour," reads the report. 

"Between Broadview Avenue and Kingston Road, there is one travel lane and one bicycle lane in each direction, with left-turn lanes provided at signalized intersections, and dedicated space for curb-side on-street parking provided midblock on alternating sides of the roadway."

Between 2015 and 2019, there were three fatalities (two pedestrians and one cyclist) and two serious cyclist injuries caused by accidents along Dundas East between Sackville Street and Kingston Road.

As a result, Transportation Services is recommending the installation of cycle tracks on Dundas Street East between Broadview Avenue and Kingston Road, as well as on Lansdowne Avenue between Shirley Street/Lansdowne Avenue and Rideau Avenue, Runnymede Road between Maria Street and Ryding Avenue, and Strachan Avenue between Wellington Street and Lake Shore Boulevard.

"The cycle track would be created by reducing the width of above-standard travel lanes and installing a painted buffer, concrete curbs, and bollards," states the report.

The report also recommends the installation of bicycle lanes on Dundas Street West (southerly eastbound from College Street to Lansdowne Avenue). 

And in addition to new bike lane infrastructure, Transportation Services is recommending a number of technical amendments to the traffic and parking regulations on the stretch to allow for the proposed changes. 

One such recommendation is to designate the northerly eastbound lane on Dundas Street West between College Street and a point 15 metres west for eastbound left-turning traffic only, with the exception of TTC vehicles.

The report also recommends designating southbound College Street between Lansdowne Avenue and Dundas Street West for public transit vehicles only, and it suggests that any amendments to traffic and parking regulations necessary for the implementation of all the above changes be authorized. 

The estimated cost to implement all this new recommended cycling infrastructure is $1,100,000, and funding will come from the approved 2020-2029 Capital Budget and Plan for Transportation Services.

The plan is set to go to city council for final consideration on Nov. 25.

Lead photo by

Jeremy Gilbert


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