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Toronto neighbourhoods all over the city launch initiative to cut down on plastic

It seems like Toronto is making waste reduction a priority right now, because the Roncy Reduces initiative is spreading into other neighbourhoods. 

The initiative began just a few months ago in an attempt to reduce single-use plastics.

A group of environmentally-concerned citizens in Roncesvalles Village began inviting neighbourhood businesses to participate by displaying a Roncy Reduces sticker on their door to indicate they accept or sell reusable containers.

At the time, Alison Jessamine of Roncy Reduces told us nine other community groups from different neighbourhoods were looking to replicate what Roncy Reduces was doing.

Three months later, Roncy Reduces has reported that around 12 Toronto neighbourhoods want to adopt the initiative, and some of them have already began the process. 

Beaches Reduces, Junction Reduces and Baby Point Reduces have already introduced the initiative in their respective neighbourhoods and popular spots like Brett's Ice Cream have agreed to participate

Danforth Reduces is also currently in soft launch mode.

Other interested neighbourhoods include St. Clair West/ Hillcrest/ Wychwood, Trinity Bellwoods, Ossington, Bluffs Scarborough, North York, Withrow Park/Riverdale and Leslieville. 

Even Ottawa has expressed interest in the initiative. 

Local businesses have also continued to join in, with Lebanon Express on 327 Roncesvalles and the Herbal Dispensary at 409 Roncesvalles agreeing to take part within the past few weeks. 

This comes as numerous other waste-reduction initiative have been introduced in the city, some of them coming from major companies. 

Sobey's recently announced they're planning to eliminate plastic bags by January 2020, and Starbucks is introducing brand new strawless lids in Toronto later this month. 

On a broader scale, the Canadian government plans to ban all single-use plastics by as early as 2021.

We already know single-use plastics do far more harm than good.

According to the Government of Canada, about one-third of the plastics used in Canada are for single-use or short-lived products and packaging, up to 15 billion plastic bags are used every year and close to 57 million straws are used daily. 

Every year, Canadians throw away over 3 million tonnes of plastic waste. 

Thankfully, it seems like Toronto is doing its part — or at least trying to — in the fight against harmful plastics and climate change. 

Lead photo by

Jesse Milns


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