bike lanes toronto

Toronto plans to add huge number of bike lanes

Toronto could expand its cycling network by over 500 kilometres over the next decade if plans from the city's Transportation Services department come to fruition. That would mark an investment of $20 million a year in cycling infrastructure to be added to some of Toronto's busiest streets.

Of course, the proposed routes are subject to further study and ultimately council approval, but the blue print is ambitious in its determination to create a well connected bikeway network in this city. Some of the major streets under consideration are Yonge St., Danforth Ave., Kingston Rd. and Kipling Rd.

The report will go before the Public Works Committee on May 16, where members will vote on whether or not to proceed with feasibility studies on the proposed routes. The committee will also have to decide on how the infrastructure would be funded. There are five proposals from city staff, though the report recommends an investment of $16 million a year, which fund 85 per cent of the projects.

It's a bold plan that would dramatically signal Toronto's commitment to cycling as a legitimate means to manage gridlock. Given the heated debate about the pilot project for bike lanes on Bloor St., you can bet that the plan will have its detractors, but the gauntlet has been laid down for how to make this city truly bike-friendly.

Read the full report here.

Photo by Martinho in the blogTO Flickr pool.


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