toronto street signs

Vintage Toronto street signs are (finally) up for grabs

It's been almost a year in the making, but now the city says it's at last ready to part with its vast stockpile of some 1,750 decommissioned street signs. Starting April 28, the first batch of 100 signs will be sold at online auction via Platinum Liquidations.

The signs, many of which are of the classic "acorn" style design, have been held in storage at a facility on Eastern Avenue since 2007, when the city began its consolidated street furniture program. The retired road makers come in a range of styles, some which haven't been seen on Toronto's streets in decades.

Every year the city replaces about 1,800 signs due to damage or weathering. Those that are illegible or completely wrecked - crunched into a ball or splintered with sharp edges - will be scrapped. The city expects between 200 and 300 signs that are suitable for sale will be added to the auction inventory annually.

The minimum opening bid will be $30 for each sign, progressing upwards in increments of $5 for a maximum of 60 days. Unfortunately, Platinum Liquidations says it can't predict which signs will be for sale at any given time, so expect to check the website often if you're after a particular street.

In the meantime, why not whet your appetite by checking out pictures of the signs in storage.

Chris Bateman is a staff writer at blogTO. Follow him on Twitter at @chrisbateman.

Image: Chris Bateman/blogTO.


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