Monday, October 20, 2014Light Rain Shower 7°C
Music

The top 10 bars for up and coming bands in Toronto

Posted by Shazia Khan / October 8, 2014

bars bands TorontoIf you want to discover the next big band in Toronto, there's no better time to do it than in the fall. Lots of fresh-faced, idealistic undergrads are back in town and looking to achieve dreams of stardom (i.e. getting their newly formed band on a stage... any stage) in between rigorous school schedules. But with so many clubs touting live music every night of the week, where does one go find these diamond-in-the-rough, musical icons of tomorrow?

The following bars are the best at helping inexperienced bands get their foot in the door. While the venues (and spotlights) aren't huge, they're usually popular, wallet-friendly hangouts that draw audiences regardless of who's on the bill. It's a good setup for artists that haven't built a fanbase yet, and patrons who love new music but don't want to risk spending a lot to see someone who, uh, might need a few more guitar lessons before hitting the big time.

Read More »

Music

Subway map reimagines the TTC as a musical journey

Posted by Natalia Manzocco / October 6, 2014

ttc mapThe Lonely Vagabond knows Toronto. The guy's been writing about the city's music scene anonymously for years, heading to show after show (and slipping bands pithy, heartfelt notes about their sets on social media afterward) but never, ever making his presence known in the bar. He's probably seen every band in Toronto at least once. Every band. (Your basement no-wave act? The only two people who have seen you play are your cat and the Lonely Vagabond.)

Read More »

Music

A brief history of no fun Toronto

Posted by Benjamin Boles / October 3, 2014

no fun TorontoIt's no secret that the nickname "Toronto The Good" is more a reference to the city's puritan goody-two-shoes reputation than a reference to just our benevolence. Even the New York Times knows that before Rob Ford we were most famous for being a bit boring. We might not have it as bad as Vancouver (which is officially Canada's "No Fun City," according to Wikipedia), but we're certainly nowhere near as much of a party town as Montreal, which was once known as Sin City, before Las Vegas claimed that crown.

Read More »

Music

The top concerts in Toronto October, 2014

Posted by Aubrey Jax / September 29, 2014

October Concerts TorontoThe top concerts in Toronto this October are gearing up for Halloween early, from Placebo to Trust to Father Murphy to (uh?) Satan and The Wytches on to everyone's favourite every-day barista costume, Stevie Nicks. I find that if custumers suspect you might be a witch of some sort, they tip better.

Placebo warbling on the stereo, black cloak all around me, haven't brushed my hair since last winter, lace cuffs dirty with ground espresso, judging you for adding cream. Clink clink. I know you're goth 5ever, Toronto, but I also know you need cuddles, so here are the month's Toronto music Craigslist missed connections before we press on to the top concerts.

Read More »

Music

Chromeo funk up Kool Haus

Posted by Dorian Barton / September 29, 2014

Chromeo TorontoChromeo are a strange beast. Basing their career around the disco-funk sounds popularized by Daft Punk's Discovery, they've maintained a balance between the lustful and the tongue-in-cheek for the last twelve years. A few of the Montreal duo's more interesting extra-curricular activities include funky jams to get kids to wash their hands, an Oreo commercial and some smooth duets with Daryl Hall (of yacht-rock mainstays Hall & Oates). They also recorded the "world's smallest album", Drive Time, with 55 songs in 183 seconds.

Read More »

Music

DFA1979 and New Pornos rock funeral at Honest Ed's

Posted by Dorian Barton / September 28, 2014

DFA Honest EdsOn Friday night lucky fans celebrated the life (and slow death) of Honest Ed's with a double bill of Canadian indie rock. The send-off for the Annex location of Sonic Boom (now re-opened on Spadina) was transformed into a Molson-branded concert venue, complete with red lighting, fencing, and portable toilets more befitting a large festival than a record store. A few elements of Sonic Boom's glory still remained, including the large chandeliers and the giant skull at the back.

Read More »

Other Cities: Montreal