Seafood City Toronto

Seafood City

Seafood City is a Filipino mega-market that encompasses produce, dry staples, a food court and of course, plenty of fresh seafood.

Seafood City Toronto

Seafood City has come to embody what’s known in Filipino culture as “sariling atin” or “truly ours,” a community hub for families to get the staples that are merely approximated at other grocers, do the weekly shopping and gather over a meal.

Seafood City Toronto

That meal is shared in the busy dining room, a buzzing nexus in the middle of the mini food court with three Filipino restaurants that correspond roughly to different cooking styles.

seafood city torontoOrders are taken food court style, an assembly line of people swelling at rushes.

Seafood City Toronto

First, literally, there’s Grill City: this market wastes no time in getting you to their main attraction, a squadron of employees saucing, flipping and grilling skewers right near the entrance.

Seafood City Toronto

“Value packs” of grilled meats without any rice include pork skewers ($13.99 for 4) presented in a foil bag or on a banana leaf, succulent and doused in a BBQ sauce with a bit of a sweet and sour edge.

Seafood City Toronto

Or, opt for two grilled squid stuffed with a potent mix of onion, tomato, and chili ($19.99, awesome deal).

Seafood City Toronto

A unique savoury, cheesy rice cake dessert called bibingka is made with rice flour, cheese, butter and milk studded with salted egg and cheese cubes cooked in a banana leaf.

Seafood City Toronto

Noodle Street specializes more in what non-Filipinos might call “Asian” food, steaming, boiling and pan-frying.

Seafood City Toronto

Here, find satisfying chicken, beef or wonton noodle soups for around $10.

Seafood City Toronto

They also do hefty pork asado and bola bola chicken siopao, or steamed buns ($14.95 for 6).

Seafood City Toronto

Crispy Town fries up most everything, like honking crispy pata pork hocks ($16.99 for one)

Seafood City Toronto

Bagnet ($15.99 a pound) is similarly substantial, basically deep-fried lechon that must be eaten with special lechon sauce available at a central condiment station.

Seafood City Toronto

Slush beverages come in flavours like ube, coconutty buko pandan, mango and melon.

Seafood City Toronto

Halo halo is obligatory anywhere that calls itself Filipino, a dessert bursting with colour, refreshment, and the texture of ice, flan, ube ice cream, beans and jelly candies.

Seafood City Toronto

Find familiar Filipino products like banana ketchup such as this spicy version from big brand Jufran (89 cents).

Seafood City Toronto

There’s also ice cream in Filipino flavours like halo halo, buko pandan, ube, avocado and mango (around $13).

Seafood City Toronto

On the opposite side of store from the food court lies a veritable fresh fish emporium with options like Pangasinan bangus, herring, mackerel, tilapia and clams.

Seafood City Toronto

The first of its kind in Canada, the supermarket has origins in California that stretch back to 1989.

Seafood City Toronto

Photos by

Hector Vasquez


Seafood City

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