Coleman Lemieux & Compagnie presents Elvis and The Man in Black

Coleman Lemieux & Compagnie (CLC) proudly presents Elvis and the Man in Black, a double bill featuring James Kudelka’s acclaimed The Man in Black and the world premiere of Looking for Elvis, choreographed by CLC Co-Artistic Director Laurence Lemieux. Elvis & The Man in Black runs at the Mimi Herrndorf Studio Theatre at The Citadel (304 Parliament Street, Toronto), Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8pm from May 21-31. Regular Tickets: $20 / Gala on May 22: $100. All tickets available through the Box Office at 416-364-8011 or online at colemanlemieux.com

The Man in Black

Choreographed by James Kudelka

Music: Six covers, sung by Johnny Cash

Dancers: Luke Garwood, Tyler Gledhill, Daniel McArthur, Christianne Ullmark.

Lighting Design: Trad Burns, Simon Rossiter; Costume Design: HOAX Couture.

Originally commissioned by BalletMet Columbus and premiered there in 2010, The Man in Black was part of last year's season at the National Ballet of Canada. A celebration of American working-class grit and of the man whose voice embodied it so movingly, the work features six Johnny Cash songs - all covers from the later part of his career (ranging from Ian Tyson's Four Strong Winds to Gordon Lightfoot's If You Could Read My Mind), giving visual resonance for an ensemble of three men and a woman, all in cowboy boots.

Looking for Elvis – World premiere

Choreographed by Laurence Lemieux

Music: Songs and interviews by Elvis Presley

Dancers: Ryan Boorne, Michael Caldwell, Luke Garwood, Tyler Gledhill, Daniel McArthur, Erin Poole, Christianne Ullmark.

Lighting Design: Simon Rossiter; Sound Design: John Gzowski; Projection Design: Jeremy Mimnagh; Costume Design: HOAX Couture.

Looking for Elvis is both a tribute to and a study of the life of Elvis Presley. It is based on Laurence Lemieux’s experience of travelling to Graceland in 2012. She says, “I was looking for the man. I was surprised to find a pretty regular, simple, loving man, who was himself just looking for his own happiness. The work also takes its inspiration from my desire to reconcile the place of artists in the public forum, and their capacity to function in society.”