Tuesday, April 21, 2015Mostly Cloudy 7°C
City

Toronto woman crowdfunding to go to Harvard

Posted by Sima Sahar Zerehi / April 16, 2015

crowdfunding harvardTonika Morgan was a high school drop-out. She was homeless, and now she's been accepted to Harvard University. The catch is that she only has until May 15 to come up with $71,000 for her tuition and to meet the requirements for her student visa.

Being media savvy, Tonika has taken her fundraising efforts online. She's launched a Go Fund Me campaign asking people to help her reach her dream of going to Harvard. So far she's raised a bit over $25,000, not even half of what she needs. But Tonika is used to beating the odds.

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City

Soon you can borrow tools from the Toronto Public Library

Posted by Aubrey Jax / April 15, 2015

toronto tool libraryGood news for those of us who don't know where to store a garage's worth of supplies in our tiny apartments: the Toronto Tool Library (TTL), currently with two locations in the city, is partnering with the Toronto Public Library for its third location at the Downsview branch at 2793 Keele Street.

Ryan Dyment, co-founder of the TTL, tells us this marks the first time in Canadian history
that both books and tools will be offered for loan under the same roof. The common sense pairing means you can borrow books on home renos and the tools to do 'em properly (but not the common sense, that's on you).

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City

Major addition to Robarts Library starts to take shape

Posted by Chris Bateman / April 15, 2015

toronto robarts libraryPlans for a 1,200 seat reading room to be built on the west side of the University of Toronto's Robarts Library are beginning to take shape.

The five-storey extension, to be named Robarts Common, will span the Huron St. side of the building, adding 4,300 square metres of additional space to the crowded interior.

According to recently filed plans with the City of Toronto, Robarts Common will be connected to the main library by a four-storey bridge and include an extensive green roof. A separate plaza connecting the corner of Huron and Harbord streets is planned for the south end of the new pavilion.

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City

House of the week: 17 Douglas Crescent

Posted by Alana Charles / April 14, 2015

17 Douglas Crescent Toronto17 Douglas Crescent, a five bedroom house near the Moore Park neighbourhood, was plucked right out of a 1980s movie. In a good way. Asking $3,395,000, the two-tone property that resembles an office building from the outside offers some star power--the home was designed by world renowned architect, Francesco Scolozzi, who also designed the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Inside, the "Scolhouse" feels more like a contemporary art gallery with its glass atrium and floor-to-ceiling windows. This house is all about natural light--an overhanging skylight and a living room that overlooks a private ravine.

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City

The astonishing numbers behind Toronto's electricity use

Posted by Chris Bateman / April 13, 2015

toronto electricity useToronto summers are notoriously power hungry. As soon as the warm weather begins to bite, air conditioners and other power-hungry appliances come online, putting a massive strain on the province's power network.

In 2013, the last year for which detailed statistics are available, demand peaked on July 17. That day the Honda Indy was making a racket at Exhibition Place, the discussion around converting the Scarborough RT was approaching a farce, and the temperature peaked at 35.4 degrees--a scorcher.

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City

5 Toronto intersections as they were 150 years ago

Posted by Chris Bateman / April 13, 2015

toronto queen university150 years ago Toronto had only been Toronto for a little over three decades. Originally Dublin, then York, the bulk of the town was still mostly clustered along the waterfront between Parliament and Bathurst streets. The tallest structures were church spires and factory chimneys and large parts of present day downtown were reserved for industrial use.

Not many photos survive from this period (camera technology was still in its infancy) but thanks to careful preservation, and a little luck, it's still possible to get a sense of what Toronto looked like when the horse and cart was king of road.

Here are 5 Toronto intersections as they were 150 years ago.

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