Wednesday, April 1, 2015Partly Cloudy 3°C
City

The 10 tallest buildings in Toronto by 2025

Posted by Chris Bateman / April 1, 2015

tallest buildings torontoThere was a time when the Royal York Hotel was the tallest building in Toronto. At 134 metres from the sidewalk to the tip of its Château-style roof, the grand railway hotel ruled downtown, "a mountain over city and lake," for two years before completion of Commerce Court at King and Bay. 80 years later, it's hard to spot the venerable old Royal York among the downtown office buildings. For buildings, being tall doesn't always last.

If any the numerous high-rise plans announced in the last few come to fruition, the same fate awaits First Canadian Place, a tower that has been the tallest in Toronto (and Canada) for a generation. In fact, in 10 years, the white marble headquarters of the Bank of Montreal might even struggle to make the list of the top five tallest buildings in the city.

Here's a look at what the ranking of tallest buildings might look like come 2025.

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City

Police crack down on UberX drivers in Toronto

Posted by Chris Bateman / March 31, 2015

toronto uberToronto police are getting serious about cracking down on UberX drivers in Toronto. Following a series of tickets issued earlier this month, 11 people have been formally charged with various violations of the Highway Traffic Act, including operating a taxi without the appropriate licence and driving without adequate insurance.

UberX allows any Canadian citizen or permanent resident over 21 years of age with a recent four-door vehicle, valid driving license and insurance policy to begin accepting fares. The controversial concept has come under fire from cities and taxi industry groups around the world. The City of Toronto launched legal action last November, citing "serious concerns" about the safety of UberX.

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City

Honest Ed's is having another huge sign sale

Posted by Chris Bateman / March 31, 2015

honest ed's sign saleHonest Ed's is planning a repeat of its wildly successful sign sale next month. On Saturday April 11, starting at 8:00 a.m., the store will be selling off more of its famous hand-painted signs.

If last year's event is any guide, there will be massive demand for the cards, which advertise sales on everything from silk underwear to table salt. Thousands of people lined up around the block in March 2014 for a chance to snag one of several thousand signs, surprising staff. General Manager Russell Lazar said he was taking signs off the shop floor to meet demand.

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Eat & Drink

That time Mr. Sub captured our hearts with hoagies

Posted by Chris Bateman / March 30, 2015

toronto mr submarineYorkville, 1968. Toronto's counter-cultural and musical heart is located northwest of Yonge and Bloor. Decades before the arrival of high-end boutiques and tony condos, folk music drifted from the crowded bars and coffee shops at night. At 130 Yorkville Ave., steps from the legendary Mynah Bird and Riverboat cafes, the first in what would become a nationwide chain of fast food franchises served up its inaugural sandwich. Mr. Submarine had officially surfaced.

Founded by friends Jack Levinson, a gym teacher, and Earl Linzon, an accounting clerk, with $1,600 start-up cash, the first restaurant was located on the ground floor of a converted Victorian home row house. In the front bay window, workers in crisp white shirts worked over trays of ingredients. Long-haired, shoeless young men lounged on the steps outside, despite a sign telling them not to.

"Giant submarine sandwiches," read a sign in the window.

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City

10 key Toronto intersections as they were 30 years ago

Posted by Chris Bateman / March 29, 2015

toronto history intersectionsThe last three decades (ish) have brought profound change to Toronto. Downtown, once dominated by high-rise bank towers, has expanded beyond its old borders, sprouting countless new residential and commercial towers in the process. Forlorn industrial districts, cleaned up and repurposed, have become trendy places to live and shop, and familiar neighbourhoods have been subtly tweaked as stores and businesses start up and shut down.

Everyone knows Toronto has been undergoing profound transformation the last thirty years, but these photos help underscore that fact. Here's a look back at Toronto looked like in the mid to late 1980s, give or take a few years.

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City

That time Toronto almost built the subway to the Lake

Posted by Chris Bateman / March 28, 2015

toronto metro centre subwayEveryone knows about the Queen Street line, Toronto's great (mostly) unbuilt subway. But not many know about the abandoned plan to extend the Yonge and University lines south to Queens Quay.

It started with Metro Centre, a joint proposal by Canadian Pacific and Canadian National railways to redevelop the sprawling tangle of surplus downtown sidings, marshalling yards, and roundhouses owned by both companies into a massive "city-within-a-city." At the time, it was the largest single improvement scheme ever conceived in North America, possibly the world.

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